Emotional Sobriety Links for Books Recommended By Recovery Blogs

Because I scan over 300 blogs weekly with my RSS reader, feedly, I am able to pick up specialized resources and help from a number of scores. Today I am focusing on bloggers who make good book lists. With the blog name and blogger, I will also include any titles for the list he/she has included.

1. Amy-Eden is my favorite ACOA/ACA recovery blogger who also does the most thorough review of books that help the recovering community. She always asked pertinent interview questions and gives the main topics from each book. I would suggest that you keep her in your favorite recovery blogger category. Check out her Guess What Normal Is.   One of my favorite posts is   “Depressed or Just the Child of Childlike Parents?”

2.  Simple Mom (Tsh Oxenreider) has a great reading list for her summer reading list.

3.  Daylie Denna Schwartz writing in Lessons From a Recovering Doormat suggests we have “I Love Me” Tip: Make Time to Read;

“I LOVE to read! When I was younger I read books voraciously, at least 2-3 a week. Yet in the last few years, I haven’t read much. I’ve been reading Eat, Pray, Lovefor many months, and I LOVE the book! Novels are my favorite but I’m the type who often can’t put the book down until I finish it if it’s good. And if it’s not, I’ll move to another one. I’ve stayed up very late on many nights to finish a story or at least get to a point where I could put the book down. This is time consuming and these days I have a very full plate so time for reading went by the wayside.”

“Reading or doing another simple activity, like knitting, puttering on your car, etc., can be postponed in a busy world but making time to do it says, “I love me!”

“I tend to read magazines more because I can finish one faster but these days even that has taken a back seat to writing and other projects. But I love reading and miss the pleasure it gives me. So I’ve been allowing more time before going to sleep to read. I’m not ready to begin a novel that has a lot of mystery and things that will keep me from putting it down. But I’m enjoying getting back to reading again. This weekend I plan to take Eat, Pray, Love to the park and spend several hours just reading.”

4.  From Geek Dad by James Floyd Kelly, Me and My IPad–Readin’ Machines!:

“I read a lot of books. A lot. I think my wife probably wishes sometimes that I’d take up cigarettes or drinking… it’d probably be a cheaper vice. My split is fairly even between fiction and non-fiction, but I also separately classify computer/technology books in their own category. I do this because I probably read as many computer books in one month as I do any other type of book combined — mainly for work (I’m a technology writer, so it helps to stay current) and also to learn new skills. And when I got my iPad? I knew I was in trouble after installing Nook, Kindle, and Google Books readers in addition to the Apple iBooks app.”

“But the good news is that I’ve actually managed to lower my spending on computer books in the last six months. And it’s all due in part to Safari Books and its service called Safari Library. If you’re already a subscriber, feel free to jump to the next GeekDad article, but if you’re not familiar with it, point a web browser to safaribooks.comand check it out.”

“Here’s how it works — you pay a monthly or yearly fee, and you get access to over 13,000 technology books from all the top publishers: O’Reilly, Apress, No Starch, PeachPit Press, Adobe Press, John Wiley & Sons, and others. You can read the books with your web browser, bookmark pages, make notes, watch videos, and much more. For example, you get access to a feature called Rough Cuts which lets you view books that aren’t even completed yet. They’re in draft form and often filled with spelling errors and missing figures, but even with these issues you can still get a good overview of new technologies, software updates, and sneak peeks at devices and programming languages and other not-yet-released content.”

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Posted on July 25, 2011, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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